Translations

The Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy Fund offers access here to a number of translations and editions of Rosenstock-Huessy’s works as yet unedited and unpublished. The Fund does not endorse or wish to promote use of the translations and editions offered here, but is making them available so that those who cannot read German or English may have access to more of Rosenstock-Huessy’s work.

Please note that the copyright in any translation is held by the translator, and that the material may not be cited or reprinted without written permission of the translator. Translators who wish to add material to this page may contact the Fund by clicking here.

Books in Dutch

Toegepaste Zielkunde

by Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy as Angewandte Seelenkunde. Translated from the German by Sam Hartman. Vereniging Rosenstock-Huessy Huis, Haarlem, The Netherlands, 1982. Paperback, 47 pages.

(For a description, see Practical Knowledge of the Soul.)

 

Toekomst, Het Christelijk Levensgeheim

by Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy as The Christian Future or the Modern Mind Outrun and as Des Christen Zukunft, oder Wir überholen die Moderne. Translated by Ko Vos.

DABAR/boekmakerij Luyten, Aalsmeer, The Netherlands, 1993. Hardbound, 286 pages.

This edition was translated into Dutch from both the original English and the revised German edition. The preface is by J.H. Oldham. (For a description, see The Christian Future.)

 

Spraak En Werkelijkheid

by Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy, as Speech and Reality. Translated from the English by Elias Voet. Vereniging Rosenstock-Huessy Huis, Haarlem, The Netherlands, 1978. Paperback, 155 pages.

This edition has an introduction by Clinton C. Gardner. (For a description, see Speech and Reality.)

 

Iedereen Moet Onderwijzen, Augustinus, De Eerste Metanoom

by Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy, as "Jeder Muβ Lehren," a part of Die Sprache des Menschengeschlechts. Translated from the German by Sam Hartman and Hermien Vriezen-Rozemond. Vereniging Rosenstock-Huessy Huis, Haarlem, The Netherlands, 1986. Paperback, 36 pages.

In this essay Rosenstock-Huessy reflects on St. Augustine’s De Magistro. He praises teaching for granting us the power to compare living human time with abstract thinking, and names hope, faith, and love as the great powers of the human soul. More than mere virtues or dogmas, they are the forces which create time spans, and so underlie all history.

 

Dienen Op De Planeet korte en lange adem in het derde millennium

by Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy, as Dienst auf dem Planeten. Translated from the German by Dé Mulder and Elias Voet. Vereniging Rosenstock-Huessy Huis, Haarlem, The Netherlands, 1988. Paperback, 130 pages.

This edition has a preface by Bas de Gaay Fortman. (For a description, see Planetary Service.)

 

De Vrucht Der Lippen waarom vier Evangeliën

by Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy. Translated from the German by Elias Voet and Sam Hartman. Ten Have, Baarn, The Netherlands, 1981. Paperback, 126 pages.

This little book is the translation into Dutch of the essay Rosenstock-Huessy chose to make the capstone of his two-volume Die Sprache des Menschengeschlechts. In it he passionately defends the authority of all four gospels, and their life as Christ's "lips." He cites de Bruyne and Harnack for his agrument, and finds internal evidence that the evangelists were not only aware of each other's work, but each evoked the gospel of the next.

The original version of this essay is in English, available from Wipf and Stock as Fruit of Lips.

 

Books in French

Au risque du langage

In France, Les Editions du Cerf, Paris, published a French translation of Zurück in das Wagnis der Sprache, Au risque du langage, in 1997. It is in paperback and 160 pages long. In addition to the title piece, it will contain "Datives Denken" from Heilkraft und Wahrheit and "Jacob Grimms Sprachlosigheit" from Das Geheimnis der Universität. Les Editions du Cerf is on the internet under http://www.editionsducerf.fr/home.asp.

 

Books in Portugese

A origem da linguagem

In Brazil, Editora Record has published Olavo de Carvalho's translation of The Origin of Speech in Portugese as A origem da linguagem as part of their Biblioteca de Filosofia series. It is available through Brazilian internet bookstores.

 

Books in Russian

Bеликие Революции (Great Revolutions)

The Fund supported the translation of Out of Revolution into Russian. The first edition of this translation was published by Hermitage Press, Tenafly, NJ, in 1999 under the title Великие Революции (Great Revolutions). The book was translated by Vitaly Makhlin, Oleg Osovsky, Alexander Pigalev, Igor Solomadin, Alexei Vasilyev and Igor Yefimov. A Russian edition of this translation was published in 2002 by St. Andrew's Biblical Theological College, Moscow, Russia. People interested in contacting Hermitage Publishers should write, call, fax or email:

Hermitage Publishers P.O. Box 410 Tenafly, NJ 07670, USA

Tel.: (201) 894 8247 Fax: (201) 894 5591 email: yefimovim <at> aol <dot> com http://users.aol.com/yefimovim/

People interested in contacting St. Andrew's Biblical Theological College should write, call, fax or email: St Andrew`s Biblical Theological College Jerusalem St. 3, Moscow, 109316, Russia Tel/fax: +7 (095) 2702200, +7 (095) 2707644 email: standrews <at> standrews <dot> ru - office www.standrews.ru  

Other Russian Translations

In Russia, Labyrinth Publishers released in 1994 the Russian translation of Speech and Reality. Canon Publishers in Moscow published in 1998 a collection of essays to be called God Makes Us Speak, edited by Prof. Alexander Pigalev of Volograd, which will include seven chapters from various publications of Rosenstock-Huessy. The Soros Foundation in Russia funded the publication of a book consisting of selections from Rosenstock Huessy's works, E. Rosenstock Huessy. The Speech of Humankind: Selected Writings, edited by Alexander Pigalev. The book appeared in the Soros series "Faces of Culture." "Faces of Culture" is a publishing project whose goal is to introduce the philosophical heritage of western thinking to Russia. "Faces of Culture" has also included the works of Paul Tillich, Karl Mannheim, and Wilhelm Windelband.

 

Draft Translations

The Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy Fund offers access to a number of translations of Rosenstock-Huessy’s works as yet unedited and unpublished. The Fund does not endorse or promote use of these translations offered, but is making them available so that those who cannot read German or English may have access to as much of Rosenstock-Huessy’s work as possible. Please note that the copyright in any translation is held by the translator, and that the material may not be cited or reprinted without written permission of the translator. Translators who wish to add material to this page may contact the Fund by clicking here.

Andragogy

“Andragogik” (First published in the first volume of the Archiv für Erwachsenenbildung, the house journal of the Hohenrodter Bund (1924): 248-276. Reprinted in Im Kampf um die Erwachsenenbildung (1912-1926), Leipzig, Quelle & Meyer, 1926.)

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Andragogy is an essay that could only have been written by someone who believed that men have only as much future as they have past: although examining a seemingly narrow subject, the emergence of adult education after the war, Rosenstock-Huessy draws on a millennium of legal history and turns the discussion into an argument against German idealism and its Aristotelian sundering of theory and practice.

The split is embodied in the approach to adult education taken by the old bourgeoisie and the working class.  At Count Keyserling’s School of Wisdom, the well-to-do student could endeavor to “find himself” in contemplation of the eternal verities—the product was to be a truly individual personality; at the workers’ council schools, the “students” were taught primarily the practical applications of their new legal status—the product was a “typical” conscious worker.

Keyserling rejected the Church and the University as failures, but attempted to renew spiritual life with the same cult of individualism that had poisoned the institutions he rejected.  And because he failed to see the difference between a personal truth and a truth which can be taught, Rosenstock-Huessy argues, he was doomed to repeat their failure.

“Unless the immense difference between truth and doctrine is understood, we are left with the impure mixture which youth today rejects for its insincerity.  Scholasticism once sacrificed truth to doctrine; modern science on the other hand sacrifices doctrine to truth. Both have had disastrous effects on the life of the people.”

“The problem of continuity, inheritance, and transmittal is the problem that saps our existing institutions.”

The council schools were concentrating on awakening legal awareness in “the” worker, at a time when the institutions of justice were in uproar and decay.  “Make no mistake,” Rosenstock-Huessy adds, “inflation is the most thorough destruction of state-controlled justice to take place in Germany since the interregnum.” Since workers accepted the mental habits of bourgeois spiritual life along with the other fashions and foibles of the class, they were in danger of paying the price of an empty heart for a head full of obsolete ideas.  Since compulsory education had deprived the people of the daily experience of justice and law, the lack was now to be made up by more schooling.

“With the triumph of the Enlightenment in the 19th century, the life of law and its spiritual content reached the people only in its idealistic gaseous form, as politics: Law is what we accept; politics is what we want.”

Although everyone sought to regenerate society, each class tried to do so in isolation and exaggeration of its own type, and all proved impotent.  They failed because they repeated German idealism’s fatal mistake of ignoring its origin in the pain and sorrow of a lost war. Rosenstock-Huessy calls for a school based on the knowledge of death, for men ready to move beyond the graveyard of their dreams.  At this School of Events, the classes would no longer turn in on themselves, but toward each other and a common future based on shared suffering. For, viewed over time, Aristotle’s dichotomy of theory and practice disappears: Aristotle’s teaching and Alexander’s actions belong together; Paul lived Christ’s teaching, but taught Christ’s life.

Rosenstock-Huessy could scorn the attempts to recreate the old order on the one hand, and to enter the old order after its end on the other, becuse he was so passionately attached to the old order and its distant origins, and yet was able to see that they needed replacement, not restoration, if the people themselves were to experience regeneration.

Andragogy
Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy
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